Axxana’s Phoenix Black Box – Behind the Scenes

Axxana’s Phoenix Black Box – Behind the Scenes

If you ask somebody, what’s a “Black Box,” you would probably hear, “It’s that indestructible flight recorder used on airplanes that can help determine what happened in a plane crash.” Another answer, from computer-science folks, would be “It’s a box with known input and output, but you don’t care how it does the work inside.”

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Less Is More

Less Is More

Why Two Data Centers Is Better Disaster Recovery Than Three Old-school thinking is that disaster recovery solutions require a three-data-center topology in order to guarantee zero data loss and fast recovery. In this topology, the primary (production) data center usually replicates data synchronously to a nearby site and the nearby site then replicates that same data asynchronously to a distant site. Although a three-data-center topology is the supposed ideal, it cannot guarantee zero data loss in regional and rolling disasters. In addition, it forces organizations to compromise on a number of other fronts. What You DON’T Get with Three Data Centers: Zero Data Loss A three-site architecture never guarantees RPO = 0, especially in the case of earthquakes, hurricanes, regional electrical blackouts, communication line cuts, or other disasters that damage the nearby (synchronous replication) site and its communication link with the other sites.

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Setting Up an Observer

The observer is an automatic Data Guard broker. It can be installed with either the Oracle Client Administrator software or the full Oracle Database software. It is preferable that the observer would run on a different host than the primary and standby databases, using the same network as any end-user client or application. The host should be located in a third, independent location—or at least isolated as much as possible from the standby database. Make the observer highly available by configuring auto restart on the same server or on an alternate host.

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Creating Far Sync instance step by step

Creating Far Sync instance step by step

            These are the steps of creating Far Sync instance in the command line: ·  Create 12.1 primary db ·  Create 12.1 physical standby ·  Create regular standby DG broker configuration ·  modify network file (on primary and standby) and add entries for the far_sync instance, add to tnsnames.ora on Primary hosts and standby hosts:

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Oracle Open World 2017 Short Summary

Oracle Open World 2017 Short Summary

  Hi, The main subject in this conference was Autonomous Database, it’s engine is used by another buzzword called: Machine Learning. Oracle claim they are investing in autonomous to prevent data theft, but it seems as convenience for handling only one version in the cloud.

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Don’t Let a Disaster Become a Catastrophe

Don’t Let a Disaster Become a Catastrophe

In my mind, all disasters belong in one of two classes: a regular disaster or a catastrophe. In a regular disaster, the recovery can be executed according to the disaster recovery plan, meeting all disaster recovery SLAs. In a catastrophe, the recovery execution fails and SLAs are, of course, greatly compromised. Hurricane Irma is a good example of a catastrophe. It is a common practice for organizations in hurricane vulnerable areas to set up an alternate disaster recovery site outside the hurricane damage zone, typically 100 to 200 miles inland. The assumption is that the National Hurricane Center’s advanced warning system will provide plenty of notice to perform an orderly switchover to the alternate site long before a hurricane strikes.

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Viva Las Vegas!

Viva Las Vegas!

It was our second time at the IOUG Collaborate conference, and we loved it! With thousands of database and application professionals attending, with such a rich agenda of interesting sessions, how could anybody go wrong?! Meals, activities, and other logistics were very well organized. Despite the large number of participants, lines moved quickly, Wi-Fi connections were reliable, and everything went smoothly. Most importantly, the quality of the talks was excellent all around. Our sense was that attention was concentrated on applications rather than infrastructure, which was not surprising to us.

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Why Your DR Solution Doesn’t Protect Against Rolling Disasters (Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You)

Why Your DR Solution Doesn’t Protect Against Rolling Disasters (Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You)

You may think that your organization’s disaster recovery solution is full-proof, but you’re probably wrong. In fact, even synchronous replication cannot ensure zero data loss and rapid recovery in a rolling disaster scenario. A rolling disaster usually starts with a power outage or a problem with network communication lines. It is an event in which replication to the secondary (disaster recovery) site fails before the primary (production) data center fails. During the interim between replication failure and failure of the primary data center, the primary data center’s production servers continue to produce data that is not being replicated (unless you have Axxana’s Phoenix). Suffice it to say, when data is created and not replicated—even for a few seconds—data loss is guaranteed.

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